Recent Storm Damage Posts

Is Your Roof Storm Ready?

10/26/2018 (Permalink)

When it comes to our homes, and even commercial properties, our roofs are the first line of defense against storms. While spring is when severe storms are most likely to occur in North Texas, the long and cold rainy days we have during the winter often result in water damages when they penetrate through a roof that was not repaired after a heavy storm season earlier in the year.

In order to ensure your roof is ready for anything the weather may bring you should check for damage regularly. Missing shingles, signs of small leaks, or mold damage are some of the things you yourself can check for regularly, especially following a hard storm or consecutive bad weather days. If you suspect there may be any type of problem with your roof, you should call in roofing professionals that can give you a complete assessment. When the weather gets bad the last thing you want to worry about is whether or not your roof can hold up against a storm, so try to do regular inspections throughout the year and at least one professional assessment per year in order to protect your home.

If you have a water damage due to a roof leak at your home or business, call SERVPRO of North Garland anytime at 972-496-2441. Our team can be onsite quickly to begin the restoration process as soon as possible.

Storm Damage Cleanup

7/23/2018 (Permalink)

While we typically consider storm season to be during the spring here in Texas, technically it is storm season all year round. Our high temperatures and tendency for drastic temperature changes overnight create the perfect environment for violent storms. Cleaning up after one of these storms can be frustrating and time consuming if you aren't sure where or how to start. SERVPRO is here to help whenever needed, but we have also compiled a list of tips that are useful for any home or business owner when it comes to storm cleanup: 

  1. Consider safety hazards.
    • Watch out for loose debris. Know how to shut off the electricity in affected areas. Educate your employees and family on how to do this safely and correctly.
  2. Examine outside doors and windows.
    • Outside doors and windows are exposed to any and every storm. Ensure all door handles and knobs as well as window locks are still working properly. This can help prevent more water from entering and deter possible break ins.
  3. Disinfect contaminated surfaces.
    • Remove all contaminated material when cleaning after a storm, particularly after a flood. Cleaning the contaminated areas helps to prevent the spread from infected areas to other surfaces.
  4. Restore plumbing and water line.
    • After storm damage, specifically flooding, water lines can be clogged or cause them to back flow. By ensuring they are clear, you can limit the chance of closures and odor issues.

For any and all of your cleanup needs after a water, mold, or fire damage call SERVPRO of North Garland at 972-496-2441. 

Emergency Supply Kit

5/29/2018 (Permalink)

Severe weather can happen anytime, anywhere. In North Texas we are particularly prone to experiencing severe weather throughout every season. 

Approximately 98% of all disasters declared emergent by the president are weather-related, leading to around 500 deaths per year and nearly $15 billion in damage. Preparing an emergency supply kit can help keep you and your family safe if you're ever caught in an severe storm situation. 

Build an Emergency Supply Kit

  • Water (1 gallon per person per day)
  • Food (non-perishable 3-day supply)
  • Manual can opener
  • Battery operated radio, preferably a NOAA Weather Radio
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • First aid kit
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Clothing
  • Dust masks or bandanas
  • Plastic sheeting, garbage bags and duct tape
  • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
  • Hygiene items
  • Important documents; copies of insurance policies, identification and bank account information
  • Cash
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Matches in a waterproof container

Contact SERVPRO of North Garland for more readiness tips and tools, including SERVPRO’s Emergency READY Profile (ERP). Having an ERP in place for your facility can help minimize business interruption in the event of a disaster.

Tornado Knowledge

5/29/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Tornado Knowledge Tornado

Since North Texas is located in "Tornado Alley" - an area of North America prone to tornadoes includes the states of Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, and South Dakota - many of us that live here are used to dealing with the threats that tornadoes provide, but is our knowledge really up to scratch? Since we are currently in the middle of tornado season, mid-March through June (although tornadoes can occur at anytime of the year), check out these tips to see if you know everything you need to know about staying safe during a tornado. 

  • You should NOT open windows during a tornado. It is a common myth that it equalizes the pressure in your house; however, it does not do anything other than cause you to spend precious time outside of your shelter area. Doors should also not be opened, as it makes it easier for dangerous debris to fly into the house. 
  • Always pick an interior room, on a ground floor, and without windows as a shelter. If it is an option try to be in a room close to the north or northwest side of your home as tornadoes approach from the southwest typically. Hide under a sturdy piece of furniture or in a bath tub within your shelter area. 
  • Tornadoes are most likely to occur between 3 PM and 9 PM, but can occur at anytime. 
  • A tornado watch means that the conditions are right for a tornado, while a warning means that a tornado has touched down or there is circulation in your area. You should seek shelter immediately if a warning is issued. 
  • Never seek shelter under an overpass if you are driving during a tornado situation. Try to get off of the road and into a building as soon as possible. Many tornadoes can easily move cars, so you could be blown out from under an overpass or it could collapse on top of you. 

If you experience any damage to your home or business during this storm season call SERVPRO of North Garland at 972-496-2441.

Hail Facts

5/29/2018 (Permalink)

Hail is a common occurrence around North Texas during storm season each year. Hail was the number one cause of homeowners insurance losses in Texas during the period from 1999-2011, at $10.4 billion. Knowing more about hail can help you be better prepared for the next time a storm hits - here are some interesting hail facts and tips:

  • According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) hail is responsible for over $1 billion dollars of property and crop damage each year.
  • Hail can vary in size from pea-sized to pieces larger than grapefruits. While pea size hail is not particularly dangerous, it can cause roof damage over time that may eventually lead to a water damage. 
  • Hail comes from a specific type of thunderstorm cloud called a cumulonimbus. 
  • Hailstorms rarely last longer than 15 minutes, and typically last an average of 6 minutes.
  • Meteorologists consider hail that has a diameter of 3/4 an inch or greater capable of causing significant damage to buildings and humans.

Storm Emergency Kit

5/29/2018 (Permalink)

Is your family prepared for a storm? Are you prepared to survive in your storm shelter, wherever it may be, for up to a week? While storm tracking equipment is much more advanced than it once was, it will unfortunately never be able to predict the future so it is up to us to be prepared for any potential disaster situation. A good way to do that is to have a storm emergency kit prepared and easily accessible. Here are some good items to include in your kit:

  • Non-perishable food (such as dried fruit or peanut butter)
  • Can opener
  • Trash bags and moist towelettes for sanitation reasons 
  • First aid kit with any necessary prescription medications 
  • Extra batteries
  • Matches in a waterproof container
  • Toothbrush, toothpaste, soap
  • Paper plates, plastic cups and utensils, paper towels
  • Water – at least a gallon per person, per day
  • Battery-powered or a hand-cranked radio
  • Sleeping bag or warm blanket for each person
  • Flashlights
  • Whistle 
  • Can opener (manual)
  • Local maps
  • Pet supplies
  • Baby supplies (formula, diapers)
  • Dust masks
  • Cellphone with charger and/or solar charger 
  • Books, games, and puzzles.

Flood Safety Tips

10/27/2017 (Permalink)

In August, Hurricane Harvey dumped an estimated 27 trillion gallons of water across Texas and Louisiana which caused damage to over 200,000 homes. The economic losses are upwards of $180 billion. Unfortunately, flooding is not something that only coastal cities have to deal with. Flooding can occur for a variety of reasons and at any time, so it is best to be knowledgeable and prepared in case a flooding event happens in your area. 

Stay Safe During a Flood with These Tips

  • Put the safety of you and your family members above all else. Items can be replaced, you cannot. Evacuate when necessary, stay with friends or in a shelter, and avoid entering flood waters whenever possible.
  • Prepare for potential flooding during a storm by creating an emergency kit
  • securing your home, moving all essential items to an upper level, disconnecting electrical equipment, and turning off utilities.
  • Do not walk through moving water that is more than 6 inches high. Half a foot of moving water is enough to make you fall. You should also not drive into flooded areas, as flood waters can rise quickly.
  • Do not enter any flooded areas before the electricity has been turned off, and do not attempt to use any electronic devices.
  • Even if flood waters appear clear they may be contaminated. During a flood the water can be a combination of river and lake water, rain, runoff, or even backed up sewers. Avoid ingesting any flood water at all costs and try to prevent skin contact, especially if you have any open wounds.
  • Avoid cross contaminating clean rooms by removing any items of clothing that may have come into contact with flood water prior to entering the undamaged rooms in your home.
  • If you do have to walk into water use rubber boots for any areas that are below knee level. They will protect you from contaminants and electric shocks. If possible, avoid walking through water that is above knee level unless you are wearing waders – chest high, water proof pants attached to rubber boots. Use rubber gloves when handling any items that have been contaminated by flood water.
  • Take pictures of the damage in your home, and share them with your insurance agent.
  • Avoid using the water supply until it has been deemed safe by your city. Boil if necessary.
  • Use your cell phone sparingly, and charge at every opportunity.

“Do it yourself” cleaning after a water damage can be difficult to accomplish, especially if stores are closed or if they are sold out of equipment. Wet walls can take a long time to dry, particularly if the insulation has been soaked through, and mold can grow within 24 hours. In a flooding event you need professionals like the ones at SERVPRO of North Garland. Our employees have the knowledge and experience to quickly restore your home to make it “Like it never even happened.” If you experience a flood damage, call us at 972-496-2441.  

Be Prepared: Tsunamis

7/24/2017 (Permalink)

Did you know tsunamis can hit any U.S. Coast? While they are more likely to hit states on the Pacific coastline or in the Caribbean, it is good to know what to do if a tsunami does strike where you live, or even where you may vacation.

Ready.gov says "tsunamis, also known as seismic sea waves (mistakenly called "tidal waves"), are a series of enormous waves created by an underwater disturbance such as an earthquake, landslide, volcanic eruption, or meteorite." Areas within a mile of the coast and less than 25 feet above sea level have a greater risk of being hit. 

As with any emergency, be sure you have a plan. know the evacuation plan and move inland or to higher ground and avoid the beach. "The first wave may not be the last or the largest," according to the National Weather Service. 

After a tsunami, do not return to the affected area until officials deem it safe. While drowning is the most common hazard, there are many aftereffects such as flooding and contaminated drinking water.

For more information on preparing for a tsunami, visit ready.gov/tsunamis.

Shocking Facts about Lightning

5/31/2017 (Permalink)

Lightning is one of the leading causes of weather-related fatalities. Though the odds of being struck by lightning in a given year are only 1 in 500,000, some factors can put you at greater risk for being struck. Here are a few lightning safety tips.

Be aware. Check the forecast before participating in outdoor activities. If it calls for thunderstorms, postpone your trip or activity, or make sure adequate safe shelter is available.

Go indoors. Remember the phrase, “When thunder roars, go indoors.” Find a safe, enclosed shelter when you hear thunder. Safe shelters include homes, offices, shopping centers, and hard-top vehicles with the windows rolled up.

Avoid windows, doors, porches, and concrete. Do not lie on concrete floors and avoid leaning on concrete walls. Lightning can travel through metal wires or bars in concrete walls or flooring.

Avoid water. Do not bathe, shower, wash dishes, or have any other contact with water during a thunderstorm because lightning can travel through a building’s plumbing.

Avoid electronic equipment. Do not use computers, laptops, game systems, washers, dryers, stoves, or anything connected to an electrical outlet. Lightning can travel through electrical systems, radio and television reception systems, and any metal wires or bars in concrete walls or flooring. Equips homes and offices with whole-house surge protectors to protect appliances.

Be Storm Smart, Be Storm Ready

5/31/2017 (Permalink)

Severe weather can happen anytime, anywhere. Each year, Americans cope with an average of the following intense storms:

  • 10,000 severe thunderstorms
  • 5,000 floods or flash floods
  • 1,000 tornadoes
  • 2 landfalling deadly hurricanes

Approximately 98% of all presidentially declared disasters are weather-related, leading around 500 deaths per year and nearly $15 billion in damage. Knowing your risk of severe weather, taking action and being an example are just a few steps you can take to be better prepared to save your life and assist in saving the lives of others.

Know Your Risk. The first step to becoming weather-ready is to understand the type of hazardous weather that can affect where you live and work, and how the weather could impact you, your business and your family. Check the weather forecast regularly, obtain a NOAA Weather Radio, and learn about Wireless Emergency Alerts. Severe weather comes in many forms and your shelter plan should include all types of local hazards.

Take Action. Take the next step in severe weather preparedness by creating a communications plan for your home and business. Put together or purchase an emergency kit. Keep important papers and valuables in a safe place.

Be an Example. Once you have taken action to prepare for severe weather, share your story with co-workers and family and friends on Facebook or Twitter. Your preparedness story will inspire others to do the same.

Build an Emergency Supply Kit

  • Water (1 gallon per person per day)
  • Food (non-perishable 3-day supply)
  • Manual can opener
  • Battery operated radio, preferably a NOAA Weather Radio
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • First aid kit
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Clothing
  • Dust masks or bandanas
  • Plastic sheeting, garbage bags and duct tape
  • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
  • Hygiene items
  • Important documents; copies of insurance policies, identification and bank account information
  • Cash
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Matches in a waterproof container

Contact SERVPRO of North Garland for more readiness tips and tools, including SERVPRO’s Emergency READY Profile (ERP). Having an ERP in place for your facility can help minimize business interruption in the event of a disaster.

Understanding WEAs

5/31/2017 (Permalink)

Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) are emergency messages sent by authorized government alerting authorities through your mobile carrier. Government partners include local and state public safety agencies, FEMA, the FCC, the Department of Homeland Security, and the National Weather Service. Alerts received at the right time can help keep you safe during an emergency. With WEA, alerts can be sent to your mobile device when you may be in harm’s way, without need to download an app or subscribe to a service. WEA may share:

  • Extreme weather warnings.
  • Local emergencies requiring evacuation or immediate action.
  • AMBER Alerts.
  • Presidential Alerts during a national emergency.

A WEA will look like a text message. The WEA message will typically show the type and time of the alert, any action you should take, and the agency issuing the alert. The message will be no more than 90 characters.

Visit www.ctia.org/wea to learn more about Wireless Emergency Alerts, including how to determine if your mobile device is WEA-capable.

Tools to keep you Safe

5/31/2017 (Permalink)

One of the best precautions you can take is to purchase a good quality weather radio. A weather radio is designed to alert you to potentially dangerous weather situations, like an approaching tornado. It allows you to be warned ahead of storms, providing you time to seek shelter. A weather radio is the most reliable source for weather alerts.

Weather radios have made many advancements over the years and are very affordable. Most basic weather radios average around $30 and can be programmed to only alert you for the weather alerts you choose.

When shopping for a weather radio, look for the following key features.

  • Reviewable alerts (you can scroll through alerts and turn off the siren for alerts you do not wish to hear).
  • Specific Area Message Encoding (SAME) alert programming (alerts when specific counties are threatened, ensuring you only receive alerts for your county).
  • Ease of programming.

If you need help programming your weather radio, you can always contact your local National Weather Service Office or for additional information, including county codes for your state, visit the NOAA Weather Radio website at www.nws.noaa.gov/nwr.

How do I recover from Storm Damage?

10/4/2016 (Permalink)

Storm Damage How do I recover from Storm Damage? Call us, SERVPRO of North Garland, at 972-496-2441! We can help!

Imagine your house has been attacked by a huge storm. The strong winds broke windows, blew doors open, caused some roof destruction. The rain can now creep inside your home, the place where your family is, and can cause more damage. No one wants to imagine anything happening to their homes, especially their family, but in case of an emergency, we have to. We have to be prepared for whatever comes.

Here are some tips recommended by Cintas to minimize the results of storm damage on your home or business.

  1. Consider safety hazards.
    1. Watch out for loose debris. Know how to shut off the electricity in affected areas. Educate your employees and family on how to do this safely and correctly.
  2. Examine outside doors and windows.
    1. Outside doors and windows have easy access to the storm. Ensure the door handles and knobs as well as window locks are still working properly. This can help prevent more water entering and possible break ins.
  3. Disinfect contaminated surfaces.
    1. Remove all contaminated material when cleaning after a storm. Cleaning the contaminated areas will help not spread the infected areas to other surfaces.
  4. Restore plumbing and water line.
    1. After storm damage, specifically flooding, water lines can be clogged or cause them to backflow. By ensuring they are clear, it can limit the chance of closures and odor issues.

For some of these tips, oneself doesn’t have the experience to do all the work. You can contact your insurance agent and they can find contractors and cleanup crews to do the job. If by any chance you are not happy with who they have chosen, give us a call, SERVPRO of North Garland at 972-496-2441 and we will gladly do all the dirty work for you.

Hope these helped. These are just a few tips on how to recover from storm damage.

SERVPRO of North Garland wants you to stay safe when severe storms stike

10/4/2016 (Permalink)

Storm Damage SERVPRO of North Garland wants you to stay safe when severe storms stike If your home is affected by severe weather, SERVPRO of North Garland is here to help. Call 972-496-2441.

Summer showers are the worst, especially when they're accompanied by lightning, hail, flooding, and tornadoes.  This end of summer has been a banner for all things storm related in Dallas and the surrounding areas, and SERVPRO of North Garland has been right in the thick of it, helping residents get back on their feet when disaster strikes.  

With that in mind, there are some things that you can do to prepare now to protect you and your loved ones during this severe weather season.  Check out this handy guide for Storm Safety and on Flood Safety from our Ready Rating Partners the Red Cross.

When Mother Nature pays a visit to the Lone Star State and in particular the Dallas, Park Cities and Garland areas, we're here to help.  If you or someone you know needs help, Give SERVPRO of North Garland a call at 972-496-2441.

Hit at home.

10/20/2014 (Permalink)

On 10/2/2014 our very own SERVPRO was hit with hail and high winds. The roof was blown off of our building, causing damage to our offices and warehouses. Our team pulled together. We worked to temporarily relocate or offices. And, our production staff worked quickly and efficently to get our warehouse repacked and stored away safely. It was definitely a change, dealing with our own water damage. Luckily, we know we what we are doing! Soon, we will be back in our offices. "Like it never even happened."

BIG thank you for helping us out!

  • SERVPRO of Lufkin/S. Nacogdoches County
  • SERVPRO of Pflugerville
  • SERVPRO of Rockwall/Rowlett